Bitter Sweet, Is Sugar Dangerous?

About 2 years ago I started reading a book called "Sugar Blues"  by William Duffy, this revolutinised the way I viewed sugar and made me determined to avoid eating sugar. Many people see this as extreme and think "what harm can a bit of sugar do you?". Well according to this book and many health experts, it can actually do you a great deal of damage and may be the primary cause of obesity and obesity related diseases.

 

It seems that in our society we have become so accustomed to consuming sugar that we don't even think twice about its effect on us. According to research done by Dr. Robert Lustig he believes that sugar is as addictive as cocaine, which may explain why one lolly, or one slice of cake never seems to satisfy.

Dangers of Sugar

This maybe the reason why in the last 50 years sugar intake has trippled and with it we have seen an esscalation of diseases. Not only does adding sugar to foods add calories but they are calories which are empty and if not burned immediately they turn into fat on our bodies. These empty calories also create problems for our body as they prevent our bodies from absorbing other critical vitamins and minerals and is believed to be why we see many obese people who over eat but are actually in a state of malnutrition.

Further more when people consume foods they often do not realise the sugar content in it, for example many breakfast cereals and breads have added sugars. These sugars are poison to our bodies and deplete our bodies of essential minerals, and according to William Duffy  not only cause many of the modern plagues but are also responsible for coronary thrombosis and depression.

This is actually understandable as I'm sure many of you can relate to the awful crash of energy and enthusiasim you have after over indulging on sweet foods.

Not only do we get an energy crash after eating sugary foods but it also creates an acidic environment in our bodies, making our immune systems weaker. This may also be due to the processing that white table sugar goes through. It is eight times as concentrated through the processing as flour and therefore eight times as unnatural and maybe eight times more dangerous. In the Diabetes, Coronary Thrombosis, and the Saccharine Disease, Second Edition it states how 'where men live on whole foods, sugar diseases are strikingly absent" It  also notes 3 ways in which consuming refined carbohydrates and white sugar effect our bodies.

  1. Produces diabetes, obesity and coronary thrombosis.
  2. Because of the removal of natural vegetable fibre it creates tooth decay, gum disease, stomach trouble, varicose veins, hemorrhoids and diverticular disease.
  3. The processing removes proteins which in turn causes peptic ulcers.

Therefore I believe it is essential to address this issue and find ways to avoid processed sugar if we really want to embrace our health. Dr Mercola recommends men not eating more than 150 calories of sugar and100 for women on a daily basis. Although for optimum health avoiding processed white sugar is the ideal.

Alternatives to Sugar

In order to cut out sugars we can make changes to our diets and this can be as simple as using natural forms of sugars such as coconut sugar in cakes and cookies. There are many other natural forms of sweeteners such as mesquite powder, which has a slight sweetness to it and doesn't deplete your body of essential minerals but rather aids your body as it contains essential minerals such as calcium and magnesium.

Once you cut out processed sugar from your diet, fruits and honey which contain natural sugar start to taste super sweet and your tastebuds change. I personally have noticed a huge improvement in energy levels since I cut out sugar and on the very rare occasions that I do have sugar I really notice its negative effect on me. So I challenge you to try a week or two without sugar and see how you feel. After all what have you got to lose?

 

 

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